page to screen


11 Biggest Book-to-Big Screen Adaptations of the Last 25 Years


1. 'SCHINDLER'S LIST'
2. 'JURASSIC PARK'
3. 'ALICE IN WONDERLAND'
4. 'FORREST GUMP'
5. 'THE HELP'
6. 'LORD OF THE RINGS'
7. 'THE ENGLISH PATIENT'
8. 'THE BLIND SIDE'
9. 'THE TWILIGHT SAGA'
10. 'HARRY POTTER'
11. 'THE HUNGER GAMES'

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Always looking for a good story, Hollywood has often turned to literature to inspire some of its most successful films.
While the industry has a reputation for ruining countless classic novels, several filmmakers have managed to achieve greatness with their big screen adaptations.
Among a few of the most notable in recent years are the "Harry Potter" franchise, "Forrest Gump" and of course, "Lord of the Rings."

oooooh!

the book!the book!


The hotly anticipated film adaptation of classic children’s book Where the Wild Things Are, directed by Spike Jonze, is finally here, and one of its many highlights is the emotional depth of the Wild Things’ performance.




The one change in the movie version of 'Where the Wild Things Are' that bothered author Maurice Sendak here
Maurice Sendak talks about Spike Jonze's film version of the book here
Spike Jonze puts his own unique imprint on Maurice Sendak's enduring classic. In the prologue, 9-year-old Max stomps around the house, feeling neglected. When his mom sends him to bed without supper, Max runs away (something he doesn't do in the book).

He finds a boat and sails to a distant land where fuzzy monsters are raising a rumpus in the forest. Since his wolf suit allows him to fit right in, he joins the fray, catching the eye of Carol, who notes, approvingly, "I like the way you destroy stuff. There's a spark to your work that can't be taught." With that, they pronounce the diminutive creature king, hoping he can bring cohesion to their fractured family.

After Max comes across Carol's scale-model town, he decides they should build a real one, but the project stalls as Alexander and Douglas mope, Judith browbeats Ira, and Carol pines for K.W., who prefers the company of owls Bob and Terry.
Max realises he has to make a choice: stay with the wild things or return home, where he has to keep his aggressive impulses in check.

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